abhishreshthaa

New member
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. is an American public corporation that runs a chain of large discount department stores and a chain of warehouse stores. In 2010 it was the world's largest public corporation by revenue, according to the Forbes Global 2000 for that year.[6] The company was founded by Sam Walton in 1962, incorporated on October 31, 1969, and publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange in 1972. Wal-Mart, headquartered in Bentonville, Arkansas, is the largest majority private employer[7] and the largest grocery retailer in the United States. In 2009, it generated 51% of its US$258 billion sales in the U.S. from grocery business.[8] It also owns and operates the Sam's Club retail warehouses in North America.

Wal-Mart has 8500 stores in 15 countries, with 55 different names.[9] The company operates under its own name in the United States, including the 50 states. It also operates under its own name in Puerto Rico. Wal-Mart operates in Mexico as Walmex, in the United Kingdom as Asda ("Asda Wal-Mart" in some branches), in Japan as Seiyu, and in India as Best Price. It has wholly owned operations in Argentina, Brazil, and Canada. Wal-Mart's investments outside North America have had mixed results: its operations in the United Kingdom, South America and China are highly successful, while it was forced to pull out of Germany and South Korea when ventures there were unsuccessful.



-Wal-Mart Stores Inc. has decided to review its $578 million advertising strategy, as it works to revamp its marketing image. According to an online report by Advertising Age, Wal-Mart as the world’s biggest retailer plans to re-evaluate this half billion dollars.

Verifying Wal-Mart’s media review were officials at Omnicom Group Inc.’s GSD&M and Bernstein-Rein. Specifically, this move has been in the making, since “former Target Corp. executive John Fleming became Wal-Mart’s chief marketing officer last summer.” Having previously worked with Walmart.com, Fleming “begun shaking up the discounter’s ad strategy in an effort to get its well-heeled shoppers to buy more merchandise beyond food.”

In efforts to build its brand image, Wal-Mart has expanded to and introduced higher-quality apparel and merchandise. Most notably, within the last year Wal-Mart has “run ad campaigns in Vogue magazine, and has de-emphasized its trademark Smiley in TV ads, which is linked to its low price mantra.” A spokeswoman for Wal-Mart, Gail Lavielle, said “the company wants to ‘have the very best resources to make sure we have consistent messaging’ across all its marketing efforts.”

Both Omnicom Group Inc.’s GSD&M and Bernstein-Rein who have worked with Wal-Mart for many years, claim that they plan to “defend their established business with Wal-Mart” no matter which direction they head after their move. Chief operating officer at Bernstein-Rein, Steve Bernstein adds to this point stating that “They are going through a lot of marketing changes, and so this is something that we have been anticipating.” Having worked with Wal-Mart for 32 years, Bernstein said “Sam (Walton) chose us, and we have always treated it like a test.”

On the flipside, GSD&M said “they have created ads for Wal-Mart for 19 years, developing the ‘Always Low Prices’ campaign.” Also, the agency worked to create the Wal-Mart ad campaign in Vogue magazine.

The process of a review, “involves the company hiring a consultant to study a number of ad agency clients, which are then narrowed further and then assigned an advertising project.”

This advertising move will thus affect all facets of the Wal-Mart division, both offline and online. As its online sector is essential to Wal-Mart’s profit base, it is important to recognize the impact this strategy will have from the “clicks” perspective. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world’s number one retailer and largest corporation by sales, launched its web storefront (www.Walmart.com) initially in June of 1995. Having re-launched a second and third time, both in July 1996 and the fall of 1999, the store’s website ultimately seeks to “serve customers in a way they want to be served where they want to be served,” as stated in our text. Striving to integrate the online storefront with the offline store, Walmart.com hopes to position itself as ecommerce for the masses. This bricks-and-clicks business, implements channel cohesion giving it a considerable advantage over its competitors. By using its name recognition, this multi-channel retailer has used its clout to expand and tailor to international markets, both online and offline.

While I think Wal-Mart’s move is great, as they seek to implement a new target market into their customer base, I do feel they may have some difficulty building their brand image to the liking of an upper class. Because of the already established preconceived notions of this business and its “lower class” image, transition into the world of high-quality clothing may be a stretch. In today’s society so many people are focused on “labels,” where things are purchased for the name and the price association that comes along with it. Thus, saying you bought your clothes at Wal-Mart may be hard for some established people to accept and further say.

Personally, I enjoy Wal-Mart’s low prices and convenience. I look forward to seeing their new move put into action. My only hope is that Wal-Mart will not loose the low prices we all have come to know and love!
 
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. is an American public corporation that runs a chain of large discount department stores and a chain of warehouse stores. In 2010 it was the world's largest public corporation by revenue, according to the Forbes Global 2000 for that year.[6] The company was founded by Sam Walton in 1962, incorporated on October 31, 1969, and publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange in 1972. Wal-Mart, headquartered in Bentonville, Arkansas, is the largest majority private employer[7] and the largest grocery retailer in the United States. In 2009, it generated 51% of its US$258 billion sales in the U.S. from grocery business.[8] It also owns and operates the Sam's Club retail warehouses in North America.

Wal-Mart has 8500 stores in 15 countries, with 55 different names.[9] The company operates under its own name in the United States, including the 50 states. It also operates under its own name in Puerto Rico. Wal-Mart operates in Mexico as Walmex, in the United Kingdom as Asda ("Asda Wal-Mart" in some branches), in Japan as Seiyu, and in India as Best Price. It has wholly owned operations in Argentina, Brazil, and Canada. Wal-Mart's investments outside North America have had mixed results: its operations in the United Kingdom, South America and China are highly successful, while it was forced to pull out of Germany and South Korea when ventures there were unsuccessful.



-Wal-Mart Stores Inc. has decided to review its $578 million advertising strategy, as it works to revamp its marketing image. According to an online report by Advertising Age, Wal-Mart as the world’s biggest retailer plans to re-evaluate this half billion dollars.

Verifying Wal-Mart’s media review were officials at Omnicom Group Inc.’s GSD&M and Bernstein-Rein. Specifically, this move has been in the making, since “former Target Corp. executive John Fleming became Wal-Mart’s chief marketing officer last summer.” Having previously worked with Walmart.com, Fleming “begun shaking up the discounter’s ad strategy in an effort to get its well-heeled shoppers to buy more merchandise beyond food.”

In efforts to build its brand image, Wal-Mart has expanded to and introduced higher-quality apparel and merchandise. Most notably, within the last year Wal-Mart has “run ad campaigns in Vogue magazine, and has de-emphasized its trademark Smiley in TV ads, which is linked to its low price mantra.” A spokeswoman for Wal-Mart, Gail Lavielle, said “the company wants to ‘have the very best resources to make sure we have consistent messaging’ across all its marketing efforts.”

Both Omnicom Group Inc.’s GSD&M and Bernstein-Rein who have worked with Wal-Mart for many years, claim that they plan to “defend their established business with Wal-Mart” no matter which direction they head after their move. Chief operating officer at Bernstein-Rein, Steve Bernstein adds to this point stating that “They are going through a lot of marketing changes, and so this is something that we have been anticipating.” Having worked with Wal-Mart for 32 years, Bernstein said “Sam (Walton) chose us, and we have always treated it like a test.”

On the flipside, GSD&M said “they have created ads for Wal-Mart for 19 years, developing the ‘Always Low Prices’ campaign.” Also, the agency worked to create the Wal-Mart ad campaign in Vogue magazine.

The process of a review, “involves the company hiring a consultant to study a number of ad agency clients, which are then narrowed further and then assigned an advertising project.”

This advertising move will thus affect all facets of the Wal-Mart division, both offline and online. As its online sector is essential to Wal-Mart’s profit base, it is important to recognize the impact this strategy will have from the “clicks” perspective. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world’s number one retailer and largest corporation by sales, launched its web storefront (www.Walmart.com) initially in June of 1995. Having re-launched a second and third time, both in July 1996 and the fall of 1999, the store’s website ultimately seeks to “serve customers in a way they want to be served where they want to be served,” as stated in our text. Striving to integrate the online storefront with the offline store, Walmart.com hopes to position itself as ecommerce for the masses. This bricks-and-clicks business, implements channel cohesion giving it a considerable advantage over its competitors. By using its name recognition, this multi-channel retailer has used its clout to expand and tailor to international markets, both online and offline.

While I think Wal-Mart’s move is great, as they seek to implement a new target market into their customer base, I do feel they may have some difficulty building their brand image to the liking of an upper class. Because of the already established preconceived notions of this business and its “lower class” image, transition into the world of high-quality clothing may be a stretch. In today’s society so many people are focused on “labels,” where things are purchased for the name and the price association that comes along with it. Thus, saying you bought your clothes at Wal-Mart may be hard for some established people to accept and further say.

Personally, I enjoy Wal-Mart’s low prices and convenience. I look forward to seeing their new move put into action. My only hope is that Wal-Mart will not loose the low prices we all have come to know and love!
Hey abhi, i am really impressed by your effort and also thanks for sharing the marketing mix of Wal-Mart Stores as i need it for my project. Well, i am also uploading a document where you would find some useful information.
 

Attachments

Top