THE PROCESS OF BUILDING A BRAND

abhishreshthaa

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Selecting a brand name involves a mix of business, legal and creative issues. The optimal brand creates a commercial impression in the marketplace, distinguishes you as the source of the product or service and does not infringe on another's rights.


Generic marks are not protectable. Ask yourself if the mark could be interpreted as immoral or scandalous. Does it contain a flag or national symbol? These types of marks can be problematic. Is a possible mark descriptive of a quality, characteristic or feature of the product or service? If so, protection might not be easily obtainable. Is it arbitrary or fanciful? Arbitrary or fanciful marks are more protectable than those which are suggestive, which in turn are more protectable than those which are descriptive.


The next question is whether any of the brands, or components, are similar in appearance, sound or meaning to those of another company. If no inherent problems pop up, come up with one or more possibilities for use as a brand. Combine prefixes and suffixes. Try different word combinations. Then give them the "see and hear" test. Do the marks convey the commercial impression, the "look and feel," that your company wants? When a few marks filter to the top, you are ready for a search.


A search can give you a better grasp on who is in the market with potentially conflicting marks which could affect the use and registrability of your brands. Before spending money and resources on a branding strategy, have as complete a picture as possible.


Before conducting a professional search, find out if anyone has already registered a same or similar name which is the same or similar to the marks you are considering. You might want to eliminate some of the brands being considered if you can't obtain a matching domain name. Check the search engines and other online databases to see what is picked up for the brands under consideration. If your proposed brand still looks viable, conduct a professional search to determine if another company might have conflicting rights and the scope of protection likely obtainable for the brand.


A search might pick up marks which could present problems, and it is best to know about any potential risks as early as possible. Ideally, conduct your search before promoting or building customer awareness of the mark, but be aware that searches do have limitations. Not all marks are registered on the federal or state level, and some that are might be missed.


Once the decision is made to use a particular brand, use it properly. A symbol should be used next to the mark: "TM" for unregistered trademarks, "SM" for unregistered service marks and an encircled "R" should be placed adjacent to a federally registered brand. The mark should be used in connection with a description of the goods or services to which it relates, such as a Xerox® copier. Your brand should identify you as the source of your goods or services. Your use of it, and all symbols in connection with it, should make clear you consider a particular mark to be your property.


Also after this process of selecting a brand name, its slogan and logo is done, this is not the end of the branding process. Branding is a long-term process. It goes on till the life cycle of the brand.


Once this stage is passed, it continues with the different aspects of managing a brand by way of having a brand identity, building a brand image, positioning the brand, also linking it to the exact target audience, having large awareness, etc. all of which forms the part of brand management.
 
Selecting a brand name involves a mix of business, legal and creative issues. The optimal brand creates a commercial impression in the marketplace, distinguishes you as the source of the product or service and does not infringe on another's rights.


Generic marks are not protectable. Ask yourself if the mark could be interpreted as immoral or scandalous. Does it contain a flag or national symbol? These types of marks can be problematic. Is a possible mark descriptive of a quality, characteristic or feature of the product or service? If so, protection might not be easily obtainable. Is it arbitrary or fanciful? Arbitrary or fanciful marks are more protectable than those which are suggestive, which in turn are more protectable than those which are descriptive.


The next question is whether any of the brands, or components, are similar in appearance, sound or meaning to those of another company. If no inherent problems pop up, come up with one or more possibilities for use as a brand. Combine prefixes and suffixes. Try different word combinations. Then give them the "see and hear" test. Do the marks convey the commercial impression, the "look and feel," that your company wants? When a few marks filter to the top, you are ready for a search.


A search can give you a better grasp on who is in the market with potentially conflicting marks which could affect the use and registrability of your brands. Before spending money and resources on a branding strategy, have as complete a picture as possible.


Before conducting a professional search, find out if anyone has already registered a same or similar name which is the same or similar to the marks you are considering. You might want to eliminate some of the brands being considered if you can't obtain a matching domain name. Check the search engines and other online databases to see what is picked up for the brands under consideration. If your proposed brand still looks viable, conduct a professional search to determine if another company might have conflicting rights and the scope of protection likely obtainable for the brand.


A search might pick up marks which could present problems, and it is best to know about any potential risks as early as possible. Ideally, conduct your search before promoting or building customer awareness of the mark, but be aware that searches do have limitations. Not all marks are registered on the federal or state level, and some that are might be missed.


Once the decision is made to use a particular brand, use it properly. A symbol should be used next to the mark: "TM" for unregistered trademarks, "SM" for unregistered service marks and an encircled "R" should be placed adjacent to a federally registered brand. The mark should be used in connection with a description of the goods or services to which it relates, such as a Xerox® copier. Your brand should identify you as the source of your goods or services. Your use of it, and all symbols in connection with it, should make clear you consider a particular mark to be your property.


Also after this process of selecting a brand name, its slogan and logo is done, this is not the end of the branding process. Branding is a long-term process. It goes on till the life cycle of the brand.


Once this stage is passed, it continues with the different aspects of managing a brand by way of having a brand identity, building a brand image, positioning the brand, also linking it to the exact target audience, having large awareness, etc. all of which forms the part of brand management.
Hey abhi, as you have already explained the process of brand building and the reason for building a brand. Well, i have also got some information regarding brand building and want to share it with you. So i am uploading a document, guys please download and check it.
 

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